Bond Reduced for Jason Jakob from $750K to $350K, Freed Friday on About 10%

Cook County Circuit Court Judge Kay Hanlon granted the defense attorney’s motion to reduce bond after psychiatric reports indicated Jason Jakob, previously was arrested on weapons-related charges (April 1, 2009), did not pose a danger to himself or others. Prosecutors opposed the bond reduction noting that while Jason Jakob did not fire a weapon at police and did not fire shots outside his home, he threatened to shoot police officers if they tried to enter his home in the 900 block of North Harvard Avenue.

On Tuesday March 31, 2009, neighbors of Jason Jakob reported that Jason was firing a weapon inside his house in the 900 block of North Harvard. When police arrived, they heard more gunshots. After about a 6-hour stand-off overnight with NIPAS (a multi-jurisdiction police unit), and with neighbors evacuated from their homes (many from a sound sleep); rounds of tear gas were fired in every window of Jakob’s house. He was placed in custody and transported to Northwest Community Hospital. Jason Jakob, 39, was charged with aggravated assault, reckless discharge of a weapon, and aggravated intimidation. Jakob was ordered to surrender all firearms, and Cook County Judge Thomas Fecarotta set Jakob’s bond at $175,000 Tuesday, April 7, 2009.

In mid-November 2009, a neighbor reported that Jason Jakob again had weapons at his home — violating his order of bail conditions. He was re-arrested and in December was held on $750,000 bond. He had been in jail until today when his bond was reduced to $350,000. He posted about 10% of $350,000 and was released Friday, February 19, 2010.

See also …

The Cardinal Jason Jakob of Harvard Avenue Standoff Re-Arrested After Violating Bail Conditions

The Cardinal Jason Jakob Charged for Gun Incident, Bond $175,000

The Cardinal Hard Lesson for Jason Jakob: Guns and Intoxication Don’t Mix

The Cardinal Arlington Heights Standoff: Armed Man Barricades Himself in His Home

3 Comments

  1. What about the most recent incident (November) when he stormed INTO THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE across the street with a high-powered weapon? He was hallucinating, paranoid, and armed, and had an assortment of weapons and ammo in his house. It was so easy for him to quietly obtain weapons and ammo after his first violation. What’s to prevent it from happening again? He lived peacefully and without incident for 7 months during which time he was contrite and acknowledged his actions. Little was it known that he was stockpiling more weapons at some point during this period. He has a right to return to his own home (he has to live somewhere) and things might be fine for years, but what if they’re not? How can the neighborhood feel at ease?

  2. It happened the afternoon of Friday, November 13th. He was not recalcitrant and combative as in March, but absolutely giddy and jovial (laughing, dancing, etc.) after the paranoia had subsided and weapons were taken. It was very sad, scary, and disturbing.

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