The Sandy Aftermath: Destruction Overwhelming, Food Lines, Gas Lines in New York and New Jersey

Food is in short supply for many East Coast residents, along with power and water following Superstorm Sandy. Long lines formed as food was handed out in Manhattan’s Alphabet City on Thursday.

Reports that crowds broke into grocery stores and took food. Pastor Richard Del Rio claims that relief is coming from outside the city, such as charitable organizations from churches — not New York City.

Gas lines are forming in much of New Jersey due to the damage from Superstorm Sandy. One line in Newark stretched two miles.

Video shot by Sean Blackwell looking down at flooding from Hurricane Sandy on East 8th and Avenue C before the blackout.

The Associated Press gained first view ground access to some of the devastated New Jersey barrier islands. On Long Beach Island, the National Guard moved in as some people who stayed during the storm told their tales.

Jim Breitling is a deli owner in Long Beach Island, NJ who has a working generator. In the days since Sandy, Breitling has been donating food to the local fire and police departments. He’s also offered residents a place to get hot water.

Feeling safe in the Midwest? The Department of Homeland Security and Janet Napolitano has compared the destruction of Hurricane Sandy/SuperStorm Sandy to the potential effects of a massive cyberattack on the U.S. infrastructure.

As cities along the East Coast face the task of managing the destruction left by Superstorm Sandy, it is projected that the storm will cost tens of billions of dollars to rebuild affected Northeast cities and neighborhoods. The Department of Homeland Security has been quick to link the Hurricane Sandy/SuperStorm Sandy destruction with the potential destruction of a cyber attack, while highlighting the importance of cyber security and the importance of protecting utilities with the claim that Sandy was just a taste of what could happen if the United States is the victim of a cyber attack. A cyber attack could disrupt banks and ATMs, knock down a telecommunication provider, knock down government websites (Naperville?), disrupt the electrical grid, and affect drinking water and waste water systems.