Vehicle Hits Lamp Pole on Interstate 290/IL-53: 14 Vehicles Run Over Pole with Damage

VIDEO: Vehicle vs. lamp pole crash on northbound I-290/IL-53 north of Biesterfield Road with 14 vehicles damaged.

Elk Grove Village and Itasca firefighter/paramedics responded about 5:06 a.m. Saturday to a report of a multi-vehicle crash with a lamp pole down on northbound I-290/IL-53 near Thorndale. Firefighters discovered the crash was on I-290/IL-53 just north of Biesterfield Road.

Firefighters reported that a vehicle crashed into a lamp pole, and then about 14 vehicles ran over the lamp pole and became damaged. About 14 tow removals were processed from the scene. Paramedics checked at least two victims, but apparently no victims were transported to a hospital.

Northbound lanes 4 & 5 were closed until about 6:32 a.m. when firefighters were released from the scene by Illinois State police.

Illinois State Police were investigating.

MOVE OVER LAW
The “Move Over” law, formerly called ‘Scott’s Law” requires motorists to move over a lane if there is an emergency vehicle stopped with lights flashing. It’s been in effect since January 1, 2002.

The “Move Over” law protects firefighters, police officers, and maintenance workers during the course of their duties.

Everyday Examples

You are traveling on the interstate and you see an accident scene with emergency vehicle with flashing lights at the scene. You, as the motorist, must change lanes and reduce your speed to pass the emergency vehicle safely.

You see that the right lane or shoulder is blocked by emergency equipment and it’s clear to change lanes to your left, you must do so. If, in the same scenario, you cannot change lanes because of vehicular traffic in the lane next to you, slow down to a speed that will make your vehicle safe as you pass the emergency vehicles. Keep in mind that each situation presents it own dangers.

Violation Examples

Failure to reduce speed or change lanes when you see a police officer on a traffic stop on the shoulder of the roadway.

Failure to reduce speed or change lanes when coming upon a temporary work zone with maintenance vehicles.

The Penalties

If found guilty of a Scott’s Law offense, you can be fined a minimum of $100 and a maximum of $10,000.

If the violation includes damage to vehicles or another person, your driving privileges will be suspended anywhere from 90 days to 2 years depending on the severity of the injuries and if you are a repeat offender.