Hear Jon Stewart Refer to President Barack Obama As Dude — “You don’t want to use that phrase, Dude”

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon – Thurs 11p / 10c
Barack Obama Pt. 3
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Jon Stewart: You don’t want to use that phrase, Dude (elapsed time 1:50 p.m.-1:52).

Barack Obama says changing the legislative process and reducing the power of special interests is a work in progress.

Washington Post’s Dana Milbank …

On Comedy Central, the joke was on President Obama Wednesday night.

Dude. The indignity of a comedy show host calling the commander in chief “dude” pretty well captured the moment for Obama

See Washington Post On the Daily Show, Obama is the last laugh …

The Daily Show, known in its current incarnation as The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, is an American late night satirical television program airing each Monday through Thursday on Comedy Central in the United States. It is self-described as a fake news program. The half-hour long show premiered on July 21, 1996, and was hosted by Craig Kilborn until December 1998. Jon Stewart took over as host in January 1999, bringing a number of changes to the show’s content. Under Stewart, The Daily Show has become more strongly focused on politics and the national media, in contrast with the more pop culture focus during Kilborn’s tenure.

Jon Stewart started as a stand-up comedian, but branched into television as host of Short Attention Span Theater for Comedy Central. He hosted The Jon Stewart Show on MTV, and then hosted another show on MTV called You Wrote It, You Watch It. He has also had several film roles as an actor. Stewart is also a writer and co-executive-producer of the show. The Daily Show has steadily gained popularity and critical acclaim with Jon Stewart. He received his first Emmy Award in 2001.

Stewart has gained acclaim as an acerbic, satirical critic of personality-driven media shows, in particular those of the US media networks CNN, Fox News Channel, and MSNBC. Critics say Stewart benefits from a double standard: he critiques other news shows from the safe, removed position of his “fake news” desk. Stewart frequently uses staged pauses with exaggerated dumbfounded expressions on his face as part of his humor.

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